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Documents

Manitobah!

The following excerpt is from:
Montreal Gazette July 11, 1870, p. 4

BISHOP TACHE ON HIS RETURN TO OTTAWA.

Satisfaction of the Riel Legislature with the Manitobah Bill.

GREAT ENTHUSIASM AT FORT GARRY.

Inhabitants Anxious for the Appearance of the Troops.

THE BISHOP'S MISSION

Its Supposed Aim.

A PARDON FOR RIEL AND THE RECALL OF THE EXPEDITION.


TORONTO, July 9. – Despatches from St. Paul say that on the 23rd ult., a special session of the Legislature was held, at which M. Richot reported the result of his mission to Canada; it was then unanimously resolved -- "That the Manitobah Act should be accepted as satisfactory, and that the country should enter the Dominion on the terms specified in the Manitobah and Confederation Acts." At the conclusion, the Legislature parted with loud and enthusiastic cheers.

Bishop Taché reached St. Paul last night. He says the Manitobah Bill was received with much satisfaction by Riel and the people; that there is no foundation for the report that Riel was raising a force to attack the expedition, and that all the people desire to see the troops at Fort Garry to insure security and protection. He said that no danger was anticipated from the Indians, but there was a feeling of uneasiness among the settlers. He does not think the expedition can reach Fort Garry until September. There are twenty-six portages between Fort William and the Lake of the Woods, and the swamps make traveling very bad, and it will be necessary for the soldiers to rebuild roads as they come along. He does not think that artillery can be taken across the country. Bishop Taché also says that Riel is glad of a peaceful settlement of the troubles, and willing to overcome any personal ambition that may have tempted him if for the good of his country. He will welcome the new Governor, turn over the Government to him, and retire into private life. He is satisfied with the expedition now on its way west because it is under much more honorable auspices than was Macdougall's arrival as governor of the people of the North West. Mr. Taché left St. Paul yesterday for Ottawa. The object of his mission is not known, but it is supposed he goes to show the Dominion Government the uselessness of sending a Canadian expedition of the magnitude of the present one through to Fort Garry and to procure a pardon for Riel.