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The Treasury Board

Photograph of the Treasury Board in the Confederation Chamber of Province House, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, between 1935 and 1940

Photograph of the Treasury Board in the Confederation Chamber of Province House, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, between 1935 and 1940
Source

 

Group of small photographs of Liberal members of Parliament, 1891

Group of small photographs of Liberal members of Parliament, 1891
Source

The Treasury Board is a key executive body, administered by an equally influential central agency, the Treasury Board Secretariat, which is responsible for managing the Public Service of Canada, making recommendations to Cabinet and overseeing matters pertaining to the government's financial and administrative duties.

The Treasury Board was established as a committee of the Privy Council on July 1, 1867. At that time, the Minister of Finance was designated Treasury Board chairman. A century later, the passage of the Government Organization Act in 1966 separated the Board from the Department of Finance. The Minister of Finance continues to serve on the six-member committee, while the president of the Treasury Board presides as chair.

The Treasury Board Secretariat is the Board's administrative branch. This central agency supports the development and definition of individual program expenditures and serves in an advisory role to the Treasury Board committee of ministers. Among its most important duties is the implementation of the federal budgetary process, which involves advising Cabinet on the financial estimates it will submit to Parliament. Along with supplying this initial guidance on financial policy, the Secretariat reviews, manages and monitors the execution of fiscal objectives and standards across the government. Among the most important of the Secretariat's responsibilities is the organization and administration of Canada's public service, including management of finances, personnel and property.