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Letter from Dr. T. Rogers - Tragedy on the home front - Did you know that...

RG 13, series A-2, vol. 229, file 1918-2577

RG 13, series A-2, vol. 229, file 1918-2577
Letter from Dr. T. Rogers, Rosedale, Nova Scotia to Sir Robert Borden, 30 November 1918
The evils of alcohol and the need for the substance’s prohibition had been vociferously argued by members of temperance movements since the early nineteenth century in Canada. Prohibition in Canada was federally legislated on April 1, 1918 with the exception of the use of alcohol for medicinal purposes. Confronted with the painful symptoms of the flu epidemic, physicians searched for the best remedies possible. In this letter, a rural Nova Scotian practitioner pleads with the Dominion Government for help in finding wine and scotch whisky that could be administered legally.

Library and Archives Canada
RG 13, series A-2, vol. 229, file 1918-2577

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