Skip navigation links (access key: Z)Library and Archives Canada - Bibliothèque et Archives Canada Canada
Home > Exploration and Settlement > Written in Stone Franšais

Archived Content

This archived Web page remains online for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. This page will not be altered or updated. Web pages that are archived on the Internet are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats of this page on the Contact Us page.

Banner: Written in Stone: William E. Logan and the Geological Survey of Canada
Introduction
Interpreting the Collections
The Digital Collections
Partner Institutions

The Logan Collections

About This Site

Credits

Introduction

The Logan Collections

William E. Logan, Canada's first great scientist, was the founder and first director of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). During his career he travelled across Wales and North America, recording his scientific observations, mapping the geological resources, publishing his conclusions, and wearing out his boots. Now, a century and a half later, Written in Stone allows researchers the opportunity to retrace his steps and mine his documentary legacy without having to leave the comfort of their desks.

While the number of websites in Canada offering researchers access to digital collections on social and political history is growing exponentially every year, the number of sites dedicated to disseminating significant scientific collections are increasing at a slower pace. Acknowledging this imbalance, a number of institutions have come together to create Written in Stone. Brought to you by Library and Archives Canada, McGill University Archives, the National Library of Wales, Natural Resources Canada and the Toronto Public Library, this collaborative site offers researchers access to a large, significant sampling of the scattered William E. Logan collections. These include his notebooks, in which he recorded his in-the-field observations; his daily journals written in camp at the end of the day; and a wide selection of the official maps and publications he produced back in the office.

Top of page

About This Site

How to Use Written in Stone

Researchers accessing the Logan records on this site have three options. Those wishing to learn more about Logan and his collections should choose Interpreting the Collections, which features an essay by historian and William Logan expert Brian Shipley. Those desiring direct access to the collections, organized by media, can go straight to The Digital Collections. Researchers who want to visit the various institutions that have contributed to this project, or who wish to access those institutions' sections of the online collection -- as well as additional GSC resources in their holdings -- should select Partner Institutions.

To learn more about the Geological Survey of Canada, this site's collaborators also invite you to visit Life of a Rock Star. This educational site is designed for students in grades seven and eight, but will be of interest to any non-expert who wants to learn more about the GSC and its work in the nineteenth century.

Top of page

Acknowledgments

The Written in Stone website was produced collaboratively by Library and Archives Canada, McGill University Archives, the National Library of Wales, Natural Resources Canada and the Toronto Public Library, and was made possible thanks to the expertise, commitment and enthusiasm of numerous contributors.

Special thanks goes to historian Brian Shipley, author of "Interpreting the Collections," who provided expert guidance throughout the research and development phases of the site. Barb Cloutier, subject specialist from the Earth Sciences Information Centre at Natural Resources Canada, also acted as an expert consultant and key team member from start to finish.

We gratefully acknowledge the contribution of the Department of Canadian Heritage, whose financial assistance through Canadian Culture Online (CCO) made this work possible.